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BIOGRAPHY

ARTHUR PENN

Arthur Penn  (1922–2010)Director | Producer | Writer

Date of Birth 27 September 1922, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Date of Death 28 September 2010, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA (congestive heart failure)


Arthur Penn was born on September 27, 1922 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. He was a director and producer, known for Bonnie and Clyde (1967), Little Big Man (1970) and The Miracle Worker (1962). He was married to Peggy Maurer. He died on September 28, 2010 in Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA.


Spouse (1)

Peggy Maurer (27 January 1955 - 28 September 2010) (his death) (2 children)

Was an early contender to direct The Stunt Man (1980) and used elements from that film's source, the Paul Brodeur novel of the same name, in the story of Night Moves (1975).
He directed 8 different actors in Oscar-nominated performances: Patty Duke, Anne Bancroft, Estelle Parsons, Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway, Gene Hackman, Michael J. Pollard and Chief Dan George. Duke, Bancroft and Parsons won Oscars for their performances in one of Penn's movies.
Won Broadway's 1960 Tony Award as Best Director (Dramatic) for "The Miracle Worker." He was also Tony-nominated two other times: in 1958 as Best Director for "Two for the Seesaw." and in 1961 as Best Director (Dramatic) for "All the Way Home."
Older brother is renowned photographer Irving Penn.
Interviewed in "The Director's Event: Interviews with Five American Filmmakers," by Eric Sherman and Martin Rubin.
[July 14, 2009] Hospitalized with pneumonia in a New York hospital.
Father of Matthew Penn (born 1959) and Molly Penn (born 1964) with Peggy Maurer.
The protagonists in his films often tend to be outsiders, either as outlaws (Billy the Kid, Bonnie & Clyde), or cut off from society through circumstance (Little Big Man), disability (Helen Keller) or paranoia (Mickey One).
First worked in television studios as a floor manager. Began to write and direct plays for the theatre in 1953. Directed his first Broadway play in 1956 and his first motion picture in 1958. Made only ten films during the first 25 years of his career. His most productive period was 1965-70, when he averaged one movie per year.
Studied under Michael Chekhov and at the Actor's Studio in Los Angeles.
Son of a nurse and a watchmaker.
Served in the U.S. Army, 1943-46.